julia francombe
09
24
Feb

CH.32 : 10 Years, 7 eye camps, 507 eyes

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We started with a simple goal; to improve the lives of our Samburu neighbours.
In just over 10 years our small and energetic team have returned sight to more than 500 people.

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Eye Camps Overview 2014

 
- Julia Francombe
 
 
 
Very few of us ever stop to think how lucky we are to wake up each morning with our eyes. Watch our children play or see the sunrise.

In Samburuland community life is still very strong and everyone is carefully taken care of. The children lead and care for the blind. When an adult loses their sight – a child loses their childhood.
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feature
13
Mar

CH.28: THE JOURNEY IN TO KIPSING

Please look at our glossary of Samburu words to the right for definitions of Samburu terms and click back through previous Chapters (below right) to understand more about the Samburu.

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A letter from Chariman Lenayasa Liberuni (above) in gratitude to our donor for the Kipsing region of Samburuland;

I as the Kipsing Chairman first greet you.  All you have done for Narrapu Kipsing up to this far since you started was a great help to the Kipsing Community.

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WC26 NAITENGEN_09_120726
4
Oct

CH.23: NOMAD EDUCATION

Trust founder Julia Francombe has written this Chapter to tell us her story of how the Trust started its nomad education program and some background on how it works.
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The drought in northern Kenya lasted longer than 2 years – the men and warriors left the main homesteads to take their dying herds further afield looking for pasture. It was a terrible time – starving people and mountains of dying cattle.

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10sml
3
May

CH.12: WASO – THE LIFEBLOOD


1. a young girl on the waso

The Waso is life for the Samburu.

A large river ecosystem that begins its journey with two tributaries from the base of Mt. Kenya and the Nyandarua ranges, it flows through the heart of Samburuland and out into the arid Somali desert to the northeast.

It is only Kenya’s third largest river but provides water to a massive area of land and is known as the lifeblood of the north. In that way it’s very similar to the Samburu, who are small in numbers but cover an incredible amount of land compared to other Kenyan cultures.

In Samburuland water is something invisible that you focus on at all times. For me it was something I had to learn to live without, the Samburu I met thrive with the bare minimum.

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